History

The Kruisheren cloister was built for the Order of the Holy Cross (also referred to as the Crosiers - Kruisheren in Dutch - or Crutched Friars), who came to Maastricht in 1438. The land on which the complex was built had been donated to the Order a few years previously by the Maastricht-based patrician Egidius van Elderen, under the condition that a cloister was to be built there. Construction began in 1440. The chancel of the church was finished in 1459 and the rest of the cloister complex was extended further in the decades that followed. The current buildings were completed around 1520. The Order of the Crutched Friars was highly respected by the population of Maastricht. They traditionally wrote, copied and bound books, but they later helped other Maastricht-based monastic communities and together they took care of the poor and the sick. During the French Revolution, the Crutched Friars were driven out of their own monastery for good in 1797 when the cloister took the role of munitions storehouse and military barracks.

At the end of the 19th century, the cloister was thoroughly restored at the orders of Victor de Stuers esquire together with the architect Cuypers. The church followed in 1905. Following major renovations, the buildings were put into use as a National Agricultural Research Station. They were to gradually take over the use of the whole complex. They left the cloister in 1979, after which the buildings quickly fell into disrepair as a result of being left empty and unused. During the restoration of the Basilica of St Servaas, the Kruisheren church had the temporary role of parish church from 1983 to 1993.

Late in 2000, Camille Oostwegel took the initiative to save this unique building from ruin. Large-scale renovations were set in motion and the building was transformed into a luxurious, contemporary designer hotel, retaining respect for the past. The hotel opened in 2005.
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